Browse the many wonderful specialists, projects and organisations that comprise our vast network of practitioners. If you would like your information/projects/organisations listed, or would like to edit your information, please contact us at [email protected]. Please browse our Network’s people, projects and organisations.

A-D

Dr Malcolm Allbrook
Malcolm Allbrook is managing editor of the Australian Dictionary of Biography (ADB) and a research fellow in the National Centre of Biography at The Australian National University (ANU). He has authored and co-authored four books: Never Stand Still (with Darraga Watson, 2013), Henry Prinsep’s Empire (2014), Carlotta’s Perth (with Mary Anne Jebb, 2017) and Barddabardda Wodjenangorddee: We’re Telling All of You: The Creation, History and People of Dambeemangaddee Country (with Valda Blundell, et al., 2017). His most recent book is an edited collection: Family History and Historians in Australia and New Zealand: Related Histories (with Sophie Scott-Brown, 2021).
Contact [email protected]
Dr Kylie Andrews
Kylie Andrews is an ECR and sessional academic at UTS. Her research centres on histories of media and gender, production studies and biography. She is the author of Trailblazing Women of Australian Public Broadcasting, 1945-1975 (Anthem Press, 2022). Kylie provides research services across a range of subjects and is currently assisting on ‘A Century of Sex and the Australian Military, 1914-2020’. She contributes to a variety of historical organisations and was recently Secretary of the Oral History Association of NSW. Prior to becoming a historian, Kylie worked in film, radio and television as a production manager and producer and developed commercial projects, animated feature film and broadcast design.
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Professor Paul Arthur
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Professor Paul Ashton
Paul Ashton is adjunct professor at the Centre for Applied History at Macquarie University and founding co-director of the Australian Centre for Public History at the University of Technology Sydney where he also holds an adjunct professorship. He has authored, co-authored, edited and co-edited 36 books. In 2020 he was awarded the NSW History Council’s Annual History Citation for outstanding contributions to public and Australian history.
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Professor Michelle Arrow
Michelle Arrow is a Professor at Macquarie University, Sydney, who has published extensively on Australian History and Media (particularly television).
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Dr Alison Atkinson-Phillips
Alison Atkinson-Phillips is lecturer in public history at Newcastle University (UK), where she is Degree Programme Director for their MA Public History and a member of the Oral History Unit & Collective. While currently UK-based, she maintain a strong connection with Australia. Her research uses oral history methods to understand how ordinary, and often marginalised, people become activists. She is author of Survivor Memorials: Remembering Trauma and Loss in Contemporary Australia.
Contact [email protected]
Dr Claire Baddeley
Claire Baddeley has worked in museums, galleries, cultural and heritage organizations in Victoria, the ACT and New South Wales for 25 years. Her roles have included curatorial, public programs, management and research positions, with qualifications in Art History, Curatorial Studies, Museum Studies, Heritage Conservation and a PhD in public sector management & museum studies. Currently Curator at Hurstville Museum and Gallery, Claire’s interests include Australian migration history, indigenous history in the Georges River area, and Australian garden history.
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Dr Robyn Ballinger
Robyn is a professional historian and heritage consultant with over twenty years’ experience who also runs History Making.
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Associate Professor Katie Barclay
Katie Barclay is Deputy Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence in the History of Emotions and Associate Professor in History, University of Adelaide. Her research explores the intersections of emotion, family and gender. She is especially interested in how families pass on their various ‘inheritances’ across generations and she works collaboratively with the public to explore this topic.
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Dr Joel Barnes, Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Joel Barnes is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Queensland ,working on the international Science and Religion: Exploring the Spectrum Project run by the International Research Network for the Study of Science and Belief in Society . In 2018–20 he was Research Associate in the Australian Centre for Public History at UTS, where he was one of the organisers of the Centre’s public history activities such as the popular Public History Hour, which ran for much of 2020. With Dr Chelsea Barnett, he co-organises Historians at the Movies Australia.
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Dr Tully Barnett
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Dr Ashley Barnwell
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Professor Michael Belgrave
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Sue Berman
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Dr Catherine Bishop
Dr Catherine Bishop is a New Zealander living in Australia. The author of Minding Her Own Business: Colonial Businesswomen in Sydney, Women Mean Business: Colonial Businesswomen in New Zealand and Too Much Cabbage and Jesus Christ: Australia’s ‘Mission Girl’ Annie Lock, she is currently researching a history a Cold War world youth forum and a history of 20thC Australian women in business. She is interested in engaging with businesswomen’s groups, family historians and historical associations.
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Dr Louise Blake
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Shauna Bostock-Smith, PhD Candidate
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Lucy Bracey, Professional Historian
Lucy Bracey is a senior associate with Way Back When Consulting Historians, working on a wide variety of projects including commissioned history, heritage, and oral history. She is a member and past president of the Professional Historians Association (Vic & Tas), and a member of Oral History Victoria.
Contact [email protected]
Dr Neville Douglas Buch, Consultant/Public Historian
Prior to being an independent philosophic-socio-intellectual historian, Dr Neville Buch was the researcher and speechwriter supporting the Vice-Chancellor, Professors Glyn Davis, Kwong Lee Dow, and Alan Gilbert, along with work for Chancellors, Mr Ian Renard, and Sir Edward Woodward (1998-2008). He first came in this role in 1997 as the Research Assistant to the Vice-Chancellor, Professor Roy Webb, at Griffith University. He has been a Q ANZAC Fellow at the State Library of Queensland (2015-2016). He is recognised for his histories of Queensland secondary and primary education, and the cultural shaping of Protestant and Catholic organisations. Dr Buch is an expert on histories and historiography of big belief and doubt, with the focus on historiography in the local social environment. He has produced several large websites and books in the last seven years. The Mapping Brisbane History Project website is his ground-breaking achievement for public history and local intellectual history.
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Nicole Cama, Professional Historian
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Emeritus Professor David Carment
David is Emeritus Professor of History at Charles Darwin University and has worked at various universities, publishing extensively on Public History, Cultural Heritage and Public Memory.
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Alicia Cerreto, Consulting Historian
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Associate Professor Anna Clark
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Jenny Coates
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Dr Margaret Cook
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Ewan Coopey, PhD Candidate
Ewan Coopey is Research Assistant at the Centre for Applied History working on several history-orientated websites and a database of Australian Public History theses. He is a PhD candidate in Roman archaeology and epigraphy and is also passionate about public engagement with history, archaeology, and academia more broadly. He is dedicated to promoting Open Access (OA) publishing and the application of digital tools in archaeology and epigraphy.
Research Profile ORCID
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Twitter @EuuanXCVI
Dr Sophie Couchman
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Dr Patricia Curthoys
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Ms (Waskam) Emelda Davis
Ms (Waskam) Emelda Davis is part of the team at the Australian Centre for Public History at UTS.
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Emeritus Professor Graeme Davison (AO)
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Emily Dawson, PhD Candidate and Senior Policy Officer
Emily Dawson is a PhD Candidate in Education at the University of Melbourne and Senior Policy Officer at the peak Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation for education, the Victorian Aboriginal Education Association Incorporated (VAEAI). Her PhD research is investigating Aboriginal-led community-based activism and advocacy in education between 1950s-1980s in Australia. With experience teaching within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education in Primary, Secondary and Tertiary settings, she has published several curriculum resources in collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander filmmakers and knowledge-holders to support teachers and schools to embed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives throughout their curricula. She has recently been awarded the 2021 George Alexander Fellowship through the International Specialised Skills Institute.
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Dr Jennifer Debenham
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Dr Mark Dunn
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E-H

Laila Ellmoos, Historian
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Associate Professor Tanya Evans
Tanya Evans is Director of the Centre for Applied History at Macquarie University in Sydney Australia where she is an Associate Professor and teaches public history and modern history. Her books include Making Histories (De Gruyter 2020, with Paul Ashton and Paula Hamilton as co-eds), the prize-winning Fractured Families: Life On The Margins in Colonial New South Wales (New South, 2015); Swimming with the Spit, 100 Years of the Spit Amateur Swimming Club (New South, 2016); with Pat Thane, Sinners, Scroungers, Saints: Unmarried Motherhood in Modern England (Oxford University Press, 2012) and ‘Unfortunate Objects’: Lone Mothers in Eighteenth-Century London (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). She has published many scholarly articles and book chapters on family history. She curates exhibitions and works as a consultant for television production companies making historical documentaries. She is currently finishing a book on the practice and meanings of family history in Australia, England and Canada and undertaking ARC-funded collaborative work with family and local historians on a social history and archaeological project in the Blue Mountains.
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Dr Steven Farram
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Dr Stephen Gapps, HCNSW President
Dr Stephen Gapps has a long-standing interest in public history, historical re-enactments and the history and commemoration of the Australian Frontier Wars. His doctoral thesis was a history of historical re-enactments. Stephen has worked extensively as consultant historian in heritage, museums, film and television and history events and performances and has been a participant in and organizer of historical re-enactments.
Stephen is a curator at the Australian National Maritime Museum, a Conjoint Lecturer at the University of Newcastle and President of the History Council of NSW. He has written two award winning books and is currently working on his second Australian Frontier Wars history, focusing on the first Wiradjuri war of resistance 1822-1824.
Contact [email protected]
Fiona Isobel Gatt, Casual Academic
Fiona Gatt is a casual academic and PhD candidate at Deakin University. Her thesis aims to recover the lived experience of nineteenth century urbanisation on Melbourne’s colonial urban frontier, focusing on the town of Hotham, now known as the suburb of North Melbourne. Fiona’s research delves into the quantitative data of the rate books, using urban history techniques, but blended with qualitative insights to achieve a recreative mode, of more intimate details of the urbanisation process.
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Associate Professor Geoff Ginn
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Dr Rachel Goldlust
Rachel Goldlust is a recently completed Ph.D. Candidate at La Trobe University in Melbourne having traced the history of self-sufficient living and politics in Australia from the late 19th Century until today. Prior to commencing her doctorate studies, Rachel studied Environment and Planning at RMIT University and worked as a municipal town planner and taught sustainability and environmental education. She is passionate about oral history, environmental and social justice, travel, storytelling and bringing sustainable living ideas to wider audiences through her work and writing.
Research Profile La Trobe Research Profile
Joanne Graves, Senior Research Librarian
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Dr Kate Gregory, Historian
Kate Gregory is the Battye Historian at the State Library of Western Australia. She has worked as an Historian with the National Trust of Australia (WA), as well as Curator at Claremont Museum. She has a PhD in Art History from the University of Melbourne and has served as a Trustee of the Western Australian Museum from 2012 - 2018. Her book From the Barracks to the Burrup: the National Trust in Western Australia (University of New South Wales Press, 2010) co-authored with Andrea Witcomb, was shortlisted for the Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards.
Professor Paula Hamilton
Paula Hamilton is Adjunct Professor of History at the University of Technology, Sydney. She was involved in setting up and teaching in the public history program there from 1989 and was founding co-director of the Australian Centre for Public History and co-editor of Public History Review journal. She is also an adjuct professor at Macquarie University. She has worked in a range of historical projects with community groups, museums, heritage agencies and trade unions over thirty years. She has also published widely in oral history and memory studies. Her most recent books are Making Histories (edited with Paul Ashton & Tanya Evans) de Gruyter publishers, Germany (new series in Public History edited by Mike Frisch and Indira Chowdhury) 2020; Migration Memories: Oral History and Heritage in Australia (edited with Kate Darian-Smith) Palgrave Memory Studies series, London 2019; The Oxford Handbook of Public History (edited with James Gardner) Oxford University Press, New York, 2018
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Associate Professor Kristyn Harman
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Jillian Hiscock, Collections Manager & Volunteer Coordinator
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Dr Peter Hobbins
Peter is the Principal at Artefact Heritage Services and will soon be working at the Australian National Maritime Museum. They are an award-winning historian who has published two books and over 20 academic articles in history and archaeology journals. Peter is passionate about public history and has led both online and face-to-face community history projects across NSW. With a PhD in history, their research experience spans international, national, state and local archives, plus interpretation of artefacts and heritage places. Peter’s expertise in Australian history leads to regular appearances in print, online and broadcast media, and they have delivered over 130 academic and community engagement presentations. A former marketing communications company director, Peter project managed a major 3-year historical archaeology research program at Sydney’s former North Head Quarantine Station. In 2020 Peter was the primary historian appearing in the ABC’s Australian Story episode on the 1918–19 ‘Spanish’ influenza pandemic.
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Dr Ian Hodges
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Dr Randolph Hollingsworth
Retired university administrator and history faculty; frequently using and creating Open Educational Resources (including H-Net Commons, Wordpress and Drupal sites, Sophia, MERLOT, Wikipedia) in connection with social media accounts (inc. Twitter, Instagram, Facebook) - see their bio here on the NZ Society of Authors.
Contact [email protected]

I-L

Dr Janine Irvine, Independent Writer/Researcher
Janine Irvine completed her doctorate in March 2021. Her research examined local history books as life writing and she is interested in how community histories are researched and written as collaborative projects.
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Dr Benjamin Jones
Dr Benjamin Jones is a Lecturer in History at Central Queensland University. He mainly researches Australian social and political history with a particular emphasis on republicanism, national identity, and public memory.
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Dr Mike Jones
Dr Mike Jones is an archivist, historian, and collections consultant based in Canberra, Australia. For more than a decade Mike has collaborated with researchers, academics, and the GLAM sector (galleries, libraries, archives, and museums) on digital collections and public history projects. He is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Research Centre for Deep History, in the ANU’s School of History.
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Michael Kelly, PHANZA President
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Matilda Keynes, Doctoral Researcher
Matilda Keynes is a PhD candidate in the Australian Centre for Public History at UTS. Their co-authored book, Historical Justice and History Education will be published by Palgrave McMillan in 2021, and their work has appeared in the International Journal of Transitional Justice, Handbook in Historical Studies and Education and History of Education Review.
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Dr Paul Kiem
Paul Kiem is an independent researcher, former secondary history teacher and President of the History Teachers’ Association of Australia. He is also a Casual Education lecturer in History Method and an Industry Fellow at the Australian Centre for Public History at UTS.
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Dr Rebecca Le Get, Independent Researcher
Rebecca Le Get is an environmental historian and ecologist, who completed her PhD in May 2019. Her research has primarily focused upon the former grounds of tuberculosis hospitals from the late 19th to the mid-20th centuries in Victoria. She is interested how tuberculosis has influenced the development of increasingly urbanised landscapes in Australia.
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Ms Deborah A. Lee-Talbot, Phd Candidate & Historian
Deborah Lee-Talbot is a historian fascinated by issues of materiality, religion, gender, and archives. These interests are currently being expressed, with financial support from a Scholarship at Deakin University, in her PhD thesis. This project is tentatively titled ‘A feminist frontier? Analysing women’s experiences on evangelical sites in Oceania, 1861-1907.’ She is also the owner/operator of Colourful Histories and on the committee of management with the Professional Historians Association (Vic. & Tas.) as Publications Editor. Deborah volunteers with the Langi Morgala Museum (Ararat, Victoria), researching, processing and caring for the Pacific Collection there.
Contact [email protected]
Ms Seonaid Harvey, Senior research librarian and family history specialist
Seonaid (Shona) Harvey has a degree in Information and Library Studies, a Diploma in Records and Information Management and is a registered library and information professional (RLIANZA) with the Library and Information Association of New Zealand Aotearoa (LIANZA). Seonaid is also a member of the New Zealand Society of Genealogists. Seonaid has worked as a senior research librarian (family history) in Research Central, Auckland Libraries for 11 years. She proudly manages a large diverse international family history collection and is a regular speaker to library audiences and further afield. She has spoken at both library and family history conferences, including AFFHO. Seonaid also organises social, local and family history events for Auckland Libraries, including their popular Heritage Talks, many of which are recorded and can be found as podcasts on sites like Soundcloud, or videos which can be found on Auckland Libraries’ YouTube Channel. Seonaid is also chair of the Auckland Family History Expo committee which Auckland Libraries’ co-hosts with the Genealogical Computing Group annually (a special interest group of the New Zealand Society of Genealogists).The Expo will be held again this year, Friday to Sunday 13-15 August.
Contact [email protected]
Professor Jane Lydon
Jane Lydon is the Wesfarmers Chair of Australian History at The University of Western Australia. Her research centres upon Australia’s colonial past and its legacies in the present. Her books include Imperial Emotions (Cambridge 2019) and most recently, a study of the relationship between the abolition of British slavery and Australian colonization, Antislavery and Australia: No Slavery in a Free Land? (Routledge 2021).
Contact [email protected]

M-P

Professor Andrew May
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Dr Jane McCabe
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Professor Janet McCalman
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Professor Michael McDonnell
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Professor Ann McGrath
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Dr Fiona McKergow
Fiona McKergow is preparing her awarded doctoral thesis on colonial textile culture in mid-nineteenth century Aotearoa New Zealand for publication. She has previously been a historical researcher, museum curator, and co-editor of two volumes: Looking Flash: Clothing in Aotearoa New Zealand (Auckland University Press 2007) with Bronwyn Labrum and Stephanie Gibson and Te Hao Nui - The Great Catch: Object Stories from Te Manawa (Godwit/Random House 2011) with Kerry Taylor.
Contact [email protected]
Clare Menck, Consultant Historian
Clare Menck has been working in the WA heritage industry for over twenty years. She runs her own business in Perth as a consultant historian and is currently working on a Thematic History of Western Australia for the Department of Planning, Lands & Heritage (Heritage Services). Clare has served on the management committee of Professional Historians Association (WA) since 2018 and is currently its President.
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Dr Tom Murray
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Dr Lisa Murray
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Professor Bronwen Neil
Bronwen Neil is Professor of Ancient History at Macquarie, and member of the Macquarie University Ancient Cultures Research Centre. She studied Linguistics, Classics and Ancient History at the University of Queensland (1987-1991), before undertaking a Master of Arts in Theological Research at Durham University, UK (1997/1998) and completing her PhD at Australian Catholic University in 1999. Subsequently, she joined the Centre for Early Christian Studies there (2000-2015), serving as Associate Director (2014-2015). From 2001-2005 she held an ARC Postgraduate Research Fellowship, while teaching in the School of Theology at ACU. In 2010 she was appointed the inaugural holder of the Burke Senior Lectureship in Ecclesiastical Latin, and in 2015 was promoted to Associate Professor. She was awarded an ARC Future Fellowship (2014-2018) and joined Macquarie University as Professor of Ancient History in 2017.
Contact [email protected]
Research profile For Bronwen’s research and positions see her ORCID Profile.
Elizabeth Offer, PhD Candidate
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Karen Merle Pack, PhD Candidate
Karen Pack is an ordained minister and a doctoral candidate at Macquarie University, researching the lives of unmarried, Christian women in Australia involved in social justice activism motivated by their faith. Her passion is advocating for young queer people of faith. She specialises in the historical intersections of gender, faith and sexuality but has also written numerous articles on pastoral ethics and cross-cultural missions. She is an experienced educator and communicator, having lectured in Australia and internationally for over twenty years, including training pastors, chaplains, teachers and lay leaders throughout Africa, Asia and the Middle East.
Contact [email protected]
Bill Pascoe, Digital Humanities Specialist
Bill Pascoe is a digital humanities specialist and has worked on the production of the Colonial Frontier Massacres website and other humanities digital humanities projects, often with a history component, such as work conducted through the Centre for 21st Century Humanities at the University of Newcastle. He is currently instrumental in conceiving and producing Time Layered Cultural Map which will provide tools to help humanities researchers, including historians, and anyone interested in history, work with digital maps. Contact [email protected]
Michelle Patient
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Helen Penrose, Professional Historian
Helen has been working as a professional historian in Victoria for over 25 years, and is a member of PHA (Victoria & Tasmania).
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Professor Murray Phillips
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Associate Professor Tamson Pietsch
Tamson Pietsch is Associate Professor in Social and Political Sciences at UTS and Director of the Australian Centre for Public History at UTS. Her research focuses on the history of ideas and the global politics of knowledge, with a particular focus on institutions of knowledge and their publics.
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Dr Alana Piper
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Fiona Poulton, Professional Historian
Fiona Poulton is a senior associate with Way Back When Consulting Historians, working on a wide variety of projects including commissioned history, heritage, and oral history. She is a member and past vice-president of the Professional Historians Association (Vic & Tas), and a member of Oral History Victoria.
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Anisa Puri, Professional Historian
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Q-T

Kerry Raymond
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Dr Alexandra Roginski, Research Fellow
Dr Alexandra Roginski is a research fellow with the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation. Her work spans the history of science, anthropology and heritage studies, and she completed her PhD through the ANU in 2018 with a thesis examining the history of popular phrenology in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand. She is the author of The Hanged Man and the Body Thief: Finding Lives in a Museum Mystery (Monash University Publishing, 2015), a book examining the lives of a young Aboriginal man whose remains ended up as part of the collection of Museum Victoria and the Scottish phrenologist who collected him. With a former career in journalism, publishing and communications, Alex is passionate about public scholarship. She has contributed to publications including The Age and the Australian Book Review, written and presented a podcast segment for My Marvellous Melbourne, appeared on ABC radio, and delivered public lectures at the National Portrait Gallery and Museum Victoria.
Contact [email protected]
Sarah Rood, Professional Historian
Sarah Rood is a director of Way Back When Consulting Historians, working on a wide variety of projects including commissioned history, heritage, and oral history. She is a member and past president of the Professional Historians Association (Vic & Tas), and a member of Oral History Victoria.
Contact [email protected]
Dr Liz Rushen AM
Liz Rushen is a Research Associate in the Faculty of Arts, Monash University, a Director of the Melbourne Maritime Heritage Network and former Chair of the History Council of Victoria. Liz is widely published in the field of migration history, women in colonial Australia and the social history of the Port Phillip District. In 2021, Liz received an AM for significant service to community history and heritage preservation.
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Emma Russell, Historian
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Cameron Sang
Cameron’s main project is collating information relevant to the stories of Chinese in Wellington NZ for the Wellington Chinese History wiki, as well as running the Wellington Chinese History twitter account and Facebook page.
Contact [email protected]
Dr Janet Scarfe
Dr Janet Scarfe is a professional historian and biographer. Her research interests include family history and biography, Australian army nurses and women’s services in World War One and World War Two, and controversies around the ordination of women in the Anglican Church in Australia in the 1980s and 1990s. She is a co-editor of and contributor to ‘Preachers, Prophets and Heretics: Anglican Women’s Ministry’ (NewSouth, 2012). She and her sister Sue have recently published ‘The Campbells of Anlaby 1860-1940’ (2021) about their maternal forebears. She is currently writing a biography of their aunt Dorothy (‘Puss’) Campbell and her service overseas in the Australian Army Nursing Service in WW2 which she plans to publish in time for the 120th anniversary of the Service in 2023.
Contact [email protected]
Dr Karen Schamberger, Curator
Dr Karen Schamberger is a curator and historian of mixed Austrian and Chinese Malaysian descent living on the unceded lands of the Ngunnawal and Ngambri people. She is currently working with the Lambing Flat Folk Museum to develop a display about the goldfields and is now in an exhibitions curator role at the National Library of Australia. She has previously worked at the National Museum of Australia, Immigration Museum and Deakin University. She is Vice President of the Dragon Tails Association which organises biennial Australasian conferences on Chinese diaspora history & heritage, a founding member and administrator of the Australian Migration History Network and an Exhibition Reviews editor of Australian Historical Studies. Her PhD, Identity, Belonging and Cultural Diversity in Australian Museums (2016) explored the ways that objects mediate relations between people of different cultural backgrounds in Australian society and museums. She is interested in Australia’s migration history, material culture and cross-cultural relations.
Contact
Associate Professor Heather Sharp
Dr Heather Sharp is currently working on a research project funded by the Swedish Research Council that investigates intersections of historical consciousness and moral consciousness. The focus of this history didaktik project is History teaching in secondary schools. She is working will colleagues in Sweden and Finland for this four year funded project (2018-2021). For more on her career and research see her more extensive bio here.
Contact [email protected]
Profile https://www.newcastle.edu.au/profile/heather-sharp
Twitter @heathermedowie
Katherine Sheedy, Professional Historian
Katherine Sheedy is a director of Way Back When Consulting Historians, working on a wide variety of projects including commissioned history, heritage, and oral history. She is a member and past vice-president of the Professional Historians Association (Vic & Tas), and a member of Oral History Victoria.
Contact [email protected]
Mary Sheehan, Professional Historian
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Robyn Smith
Dr Robyn Smith is a Conjoint Fellow at the University of Newcastle, a PhD (Political History), Master of Cultural Heritage and Bachelor of Arts (Journalism & Anthropology) from Darwin. She is presently researching massacre sites in the NT for the UoN’s Colonial Frontier Massacres project.
Research Profile: https://www.newcastle.edu.au/profile/robyn-smith
Kathleen Stringer, Archivist/Researcher
After forty years of working in archives and museums, Kathleen is working as a freelance archivist / researcher, while she completes her Ph.D. (focusing on prisoners’ stories in Otago). Particularly interested in social history, Kathleen has an extensive knowledge of New Zealand resources and research methods gained through academic study and her own genealogical research. Although she is specially interested in the colonization period and feminist stories, Kathleen has a passion for assisting all members of society uncover and celebrate their story. She is the incoming secretary for ARANZ (Archives and Records Association of NZ).
Contact [email protected]
Professor Lucy Taksa
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Diana Thorp
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U-Z

Eloise Wallace, Museum Director
Eloise Wallace is the Director of Tairāwhiti Museum in Gisborne, Co-Chair of Museums Aotearoa, Deputy Chair of Historic Places Tairāwhiti and a trustee of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.
Contact [email protected]
Social Linkedin
Twitter @Tairawhiti_muse
Dr Cheryl Ware
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Dr Imogen Wegman, Lecturer in history
Having grown up in Hobart, Imogen has a strong connection to her island home. She completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Tasmania, before moving to the UK to join the University of East Anglia’s Landscape History MA program. Her dissertation examined the creation of ‘isolated’ parish churches – those that stand in the middle of a field, far from their village. She returned to Tasmania to complete her PhD in History at the University of Tasmania, examining the differences between land grants given to convicts and free settlers. Her research continues to examine the practicalities of the life in the early years of a colony, using digital tools such as GIS (mapping) to understand the historic landscape and extract its stories.
Imogen is now a lecturer in history at the University of Tasmania, teaching in the Diploma of Family History and the Bachelor of Arts. She continues to nerd out about maps with her students, teaching them how to find and interpret them for their own research.
Imogen has a keen interest in public histories, and has held a range of non-academic roles that have connected her research with the public. As a tour guide she converted her thesis into a commentary designed for tourists with little to no background knowledge. She also worked behind the help desk in a public library, helping clients research their family history, find information about their house, or pursue other historical questions. She is a popular public speaker, and is regularly invited to speak to diverse audiences. In 2016 she co-founded A Pint of History – a monthly pub-based history event in Hobart, which continues to a provide a space for academics and experts to present their historical research to a large general audience.
Contact [email protected]
Dr Derek R. Whaley, Research Librarian
Derek R. Whaley is a Research Librarian at Auckland Libraries with a wide range of historical interests from medieval French royalty to North Auckland transportation and thoroughfares to the railroads of Santa Cruz County, California.
Contact [email protected]
Dr Ian Willis, Historian
Dr Ian Willis is an honorary fellow at the University of Wollongong and completed his PhD in Australian History at Wollongong in 2004. He has awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) for his service to community history in 2019. His general area of research is centred on local studies in and around the Macarthur region of New South Wales, with works published in popular media to peer-reviewed journals. Dr Willis currently has several on-going research projects based on this regional area. He is an active blogger on the history of the Macarthur region at Camden History Notes.
Contact [email protected]
Gaye Wilson, PhD, CUG, JP
Gaye is an independent Scholar in Egyptology and Modern History who runs Personal and Business Coaching Services (specialising in Research Students) and editorial Services (editing, proofreading, desktop publishing services).
Associate Professor Nathan Wise
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Dr Xu Daozhi
Dr Xu Daozhi is a Macquarie University Research Fellow in the Department of Media, Communication, Creative Arts, Literature, and Language. She focuses on Indigenous and Asian interrelations in contemporary Australian literature published by Indigenous and Asian Australian authors. She is particularly interested in the ongoing history of Indigenous-Chinese relationships. Her monograph Indigenous Cultural Capital: Postcolonial Narratives in Australian Children’s Literature (2018) won the Biennial Australian Studies in China Book Prize, awarded by Australia–China Council in 2018. It was also shortlisted for the Association for the Study of Australian Literature “Alvie Egan Award” in 2019.
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Research Profile Macquarie University Profile
Ms Christine Yeats
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Dr Linda Young, Honourary Fellow
Honorary Fellow at Deakin University
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